Author Topic: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project  (Read 15116 times)

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Offline dok101

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Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« on: August 13, 2010, 04:28:34 PM »
Hello everyone.  I am the Group Administrator for the newly created Aramaic DNA Project at FTDNA.  We would appreciate the support of all of you, our brothers and sisters, in this unique undertaking.  I have copied the tentative content of our Project Background and Project Goals pages, below. 

http://www.familytreedna.com/public/AramaicDNAProject/default.aspx

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The Aramaic DNA Project hopes to bring together all Aramaic (also known as Modern or Neo-Aramaic) speaking people and people of Aramaic-speaking heritage of the world. For 3000 years, and despite unrelenting strife of every conceivable sort, the Aramaic language has steadfastly retained a continuous presence in the region known as the Fertile Crescent.

The people who retained a form of the Aramaic language as their mother tongue offer a tremendous opportunity to catch a glimpse many centuries, and perhaps even millennia, into the past. The testing of DNA, specifically one's mtDNA and Y-DNA, is ideally suited for discovering one’s deep ancestral roots. This is because mtDNA and Y-DNA remain more or less unchanged for thousands of years.

If we wish to understand the origins of the Aramaic-speaking people, it is imperative to undertake this task now. The growing diasporic aspect of many, if not all, Aramaic-speaking communities is at the root of this urgency. If this project were not undertaken, or pursued with sufficient zeal, we may forever squander our ability to peer, with least obstruction, back to the dawn of our civilization.

The Aramaic DNA Project aims to answer questions of interest to Aramaic-speakers regarding their recent and distant origins. It will also delve into the relationships between the different Aramaic-speaking groups with ancestral origins from different geographical regions including, but not limited to: Diyarbakir, Hakkari, Harput, Mardin, Mosul, Salamas, Seert, Urfa, Urmia, and Tur Abdin.

The project, in remaining true to standard scientific practices, as well as FTDNA’s terms of agreement, will remain objective and has no affiliations whatsoever. We encourage all Aramaic-speaking people and people of Aramaic-speaking heritage to join the project regardless of self-designation, including, but not limited to: Aramaeans, Assyrians, Chaldeans, Syrians, Ancient Syrians, and Syriacs. People of Aramaic-speaking heritage who have lost usage of the language due to assimilation are encouraged to join. All participants will be offered the option to identify by their preferred self-designation. The project is open to all religious affiliations and not limited to Christian communities. We welcome, with open hearts, Aramaic-speakers among the Jewish and Mandaean communities, and Aramaic-speakers from other religious affiliations. All Aramaic-speakers will be classified according to their self-designation into the appropriate haplogroup categories

We are eagerly looking forward to the official launch of the Aramaic DNA Project --tentatively set for August-- and sincerely hope all Aramaic-speaking people tested at Family Tree DNA will consider participating in this very special endeavor.

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Through the Aramaic DNA Project we wish to answer the following three questions:

1. What relationships (if any) can be discerned by examining the haplogroup/haplotype data of all remaining Aramaic speaking people of the world?

2. What relationships (if any) can be discerned by examining the haplogroup/haplotype data of the:

a) Christian speakers of Aramaic?

b) Jewish speakers of Aramaic?

c) Members of other religions who are speakers of Aramaic (Mandaean, Muslim, etc.)?

3. How do Aramaic speakers compare genetically to other people in the region: Armenians, Jews (Mizrahi, Ashkenazi & Sephardi), Kurds, Iranians, Turks, Levantine Syrians & Iraqis, Arabs, Azeris, Georgians, etc.)?

Thank you very much everyone.  Please, if anyone has any questions, do not hesitate to shoot me a PM. 

Paul
« Last Edit: August 13, 2010, 05:02:04 PM by dok101 »



Offline dok101

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Assyrian/Chaldean/Syriac and Armenian Y-DNA Frequencies
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2010, 02:57:44 PM »
A comparison of Assyrian/Chaldean/Syriac and Armenian Y-DNA frequencies.

The Armenian data is drawn from the most recently updated FTDNA Armenian project frequencies.

The Assyrian/Chaldean/Syriac data is drawn from the FTDNA Assyrian and Aramaic projects, 23andMe users acknowledging their Assyrian/Chaldean/Syriac identity, and the study, Y-Chromosomal Diversity in Lebanon Is Structured by Recent Historical Events.

    ASY(55) ARM(190)
E1b1b1 0.036 0.080
F 0.018 0.010
G 0.109 0.150
I 0.018 0.060
J1 0.145 0.150
J2 0.145 0.180
N 0.018 0.000
Q1b 0.018 0.010
R1a 0.055 0.020
R1b 0.273 0.250
R2 0.036 0.030
T 0.127 0.050
L 0.000 0.010
A 0.000 0.010

Assyrian Project participants excluded based on ancestry and other details provided (e.g. Saint Thomas Christians of southwestern India): N84161 N28634 N38706 44462 43426 N23437 N63576 148762 130501 166233 32460 N17162 145221

As examination of the intra-Assyrian/Chaldean/Syriac populations becomes possible, it will be covered in my analyses.

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2010, 03:03:23 PM »
From my post on another forum:

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The highest concentration of T in the Middle East is observed among the populations inhabiting southern regions of Mesopotamia. I believe it is a possibility that the T haplogroup frequency among Assyrian/Chaldean/Syriac men to be most driven by that fact. Well, that is, if we can assume that T haplogroup was more or less at least as frequent during the ages of antiquity in those particular southern Mesopotamian regions, as it is now.

Assyrian Voice Forum

Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2010, 03:03:23 PM »

Offline Rumtaya

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2010, 04:50:18 PM »
According to our Assyrian History. We should be mixed due to all the deportations. So as we see at the hand of your graphic it just shows us that we are.

Mostly however we seem to have a "caucasian" algonsied the J2 (fertial cresent) and the J1 (arabia). Tell me if i am wrong. But we just can conclude that due to that we can say....our forefathers were partly from akkadian-ammorite ancestry (came from south arabia) and some Hurrian (beeing from "caucasian)..

am i wrong?

Offline Micho

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2010, 05:55:03 PM »
Rumtaya//

Our forefathers came from Anatolia, not Arabia.

Offline Hanuni

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2010, 06:01:23 PM »
It is correct that J1 most likely emerged in Anatolia as did R1b.
“Their enemies had realized their national potential long before the Assyrians themselves. The enemy was not afraid of good farmers, good parents, good church-going parishioners...the enemy was afraid of Assyrians wrapped in nationhood.”

-Mount Semele, Ivan Kakovitch

Offline Tambur

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2010, 07:08:29 PM »
J1 originated on the Arabian plate which includes Mesopotamia, and the Levant, but not Anatolia.

it also says J1 is very highly concentrated on Semites.

No, J1 originated in Anatolia and is actually most diverse and frequent in Anatolia and the Caucasus, however among Arabs there's a branch of J1 that's popular which is J1e (Known as J1c3), this is the haplogroups that's associated with Semites, J1 is associated with north middle eastern populations rather than Arabs.

Assyrians carry both J1 and J1e, but the main haplogroup they carry is R1b (R1b1b2a to be exact), apperantly not all Assyrian R1b's are from Anatolia, some of them seem to be from a European origin, I guess in the end of the day we're not pure paternally nor maternally, but you don't need a dna test to confirm that.

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2010, 01:19:47 AM »
wrong, Rumtaya and Micho, Assyrians are mostly a mix of Sumerians + Akkadians + Amorites, don't forget we probably have mixed with some Persians since we were under the rule of many Persians empires, and mixed with Jews because remember, when we conquered Israel, we deported MANY of them so they spread out across Assyria and beyond, known as the 10 lost tribes of Israel, and we did conquer Egypt...

Hello mrzurnaci.  Yes, I am inclined to agree with you, based on what I have gathered from the genetic, archaeological, anthropological, and historical records.  We are an amalgam of these peoples.  Some of them more distinct than others.  And some to a greater extent than others. 

Once more folks participate we will be able to examine the data in more detail.  Although some patterns have emerged (e.g. the Armenian affinity), there is a great deal left to be understood. 

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2010, 01:45:26 AM »
I wrote the following on another forum, regarding haplogroup G1a.  I am ASY MRCT4.

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There appears to be a relationship between the British G1a pair and the Armenians and Assyrian. This relationship, roughly two millennia ago, between British men and Armenians and Assyrians, is not exclusive to haplogroup G. I have observed it in haplogroup R2 as well. The British men share common ancestors with Armenians and Assyrians roughly contemporaneous to the expansion of Roman dominion in the region. Even before Trajan established the provinces of Mesopotamia, Armenia, and Assyria in 116 AD, Rome's sphere of influence had long been present in the region. And even after the provinces had been dissolved by Trajan's successor, Hadrian, new provinces, for example, another Mesopotamian province under Septimius Severus, were established. Although it was limited in its expansiveness --at least compared to its namesake predecessor-- it demonstrates a continued presence in the general region. Not to mention the creation of Roman legions, most notably the Legio I and II Armeniaca. Interesting to note that Severus was born in Libya, led his armies into Parthian territory, and died in Britannia!

« Last Edit: August 24, 2010, 01:50:56 AM by dok101 »

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2010, 01:53:08 AM »


Roman expansion.

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2010, 10:41:06 PM »
Tree of Y-DNA haplogroup frequencies of relevant populations. The "AramaicProj" consists of data drawn from the FTDNA Aramaic and Assyrian projects, 23andMe database, and the Zalloua et al., Lebanon study.

Offline Rumtaya

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2010, 11:45:37 AM »
btw. why is it called "Aramaic DNA Project"?

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2010, 12:23:38 PM »
btw. why is it called "Aramaic DNA Project"?

Hi Rumtaya,

The native Aramaic speaking people of today, by and large, are the descendants of the Aramaic speaking people of antiquity.  We wish to bring together and examine the genetics of all Aramaic speakers.  Whether they be Christian, Jewish, Mandaean, Muslim, etc., is of no consequence.  If they remain, or descend from, speakers of an Aramaic dialect, we seek their participation. 




Offline Rumtaya

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #13 on: August 26, 2010, 03:39:47 PM »
Hi Rumtaya,

The native Aramaic speaking people of today, by and large, are the descendants of the Aramaic speaking people of antiquity.  We wish to bring together and examine the genetics of all Aramaic speakers.  Whether they be Christian, Jewish, Mandaean, Muslim, etc., is of no consequence.  If they remain, or descend from, speakers of an Aramaic dialect, we seek their participation. 


Okey I understand, but wouldnt it be better if you would have used "Semetic" :D since thats the general word for the languages. And not to sound like a smart ass, but we do not talk aramaic :D.

however hope the project is going to be participated by many.

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #14 on: August 26, 2010, 04:15:03 PM »
Okey I understand, but wouldnt it be better if you would have used "Semetic" :D since thats the general word for the languages. And not to sound like a smart ass, but we do not talk aramaic :D.

however hope the project is going to be participated by many.

Semitic is too broad a nomenclature for our purposes.  If you will refer to the image attached, any Semitic project would effectively encompass the entire Near Eastern world, excluding the Indo-European speaking populations. 

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #15 on: September 10, 2010, 04:42:50 AM »
Some of you that have followed the DNA discussions here will recall the study, A Predominantly Neolithic Origin for European Paternal Lineages (citation below), that came out earlier in the year.  I wish to add, for the purpose of comparison, the R1b1b2 frequencies of Northern Iraqi Jews, Assyrians/Chaldeans/Syriacs, and Armenians, to the data gathered, mostly via the aforementioned study:

n, Population-Sampling, R-M269, Source

65 Wales National 92% Balaresque et al.
116 Spain Basques 87% Balaresque et al.
796 Ireland National 85% Moore et al.
80 Spain Catalonia 81% Balaresque et al.
82 France Ile et Vilaine 81% Balaresque et al.
57 France Haute-Garonne 79% Balaresque et al.
64 England Cornwall 78% Balaresque et al.
48 France Loire-Atlantique 77% Balaresque et al.
75 France Finistère 76% Balaresque et al.
61 France Basques 75% Balaresque et al.
95 Spain East Andalucia 72% Balaresque et al.
63 Spain Castilla La Mancha 72% Balaresque et al.
50 France Vendeé 68% Balaresque et al.
43 France Baie de Somme 63% Balaresque et al.
43 England Leicestershire 62% Balaresque et al.
79 Italy North-East (Ladin) 61% Balaresque et al.
88 Spain Galicia 58% Balaresque et al.
72 Spain West Andalucia 55% Balaresque et al.
78 Portugal South 46% Balaresque et al.
99 Italy North-West 45% Balaresque et al.
56 Denmark National 43% Balaresque et al.
84 Netherlands National 42% Balaresque et al.
67 Italy North East 42% Battaglia et al.
471 Russia Bashkirs 34% Lobov et al.
80 Germany Bavaria 32% Balaresque et al.
122 Italy West Sicily 30% Di Gaetano et al.
99 Jews North Iraq ≈25% Nebel et al. (Whit Athey estimated based on 6 STR loci: DYS19, DYS388, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, and DYS393)
198 Armenians 24% FTDNA Armenian Project
60 ASY/CHA/SYR 23% Iraq, Assyrian, and Aramaic FTDNA Projects, 23andMe, and Zalloua et al.
75 Slovenia National 21% Battaglia et al.
70 Slovenia National2 21% Balaresque et al.
152 Turkey Central 19% Cinnioğlu et al.
64 Macedonia Albanians 19% Battaglia et al.
114 Italy East Sicily 18% Di Gaetano et al.
193 Crete National 17% King et al.
930 Italy Sardinia 17% Contu et al.
33 Iran North 15% Regueiro et al.
268 Moldova 15% Varzari et al.
171 Greece National 14% King et al.
163 Turkey West 14% Cinnioğlu et al.
54 Romania National 13% Varzari et al.
208 Turkey East 12% Cinnioğlu et al.
93 Algeria 12% Robino et al.
107 Russia Roslavl 11% Balanovsky et al.
139 Iraq National 11% Al-Zahery et al.
66 Nepal Newar 11% Gayden et al.
100 Serbia National 10% Balaresque et al.
81 Bosnia-Herzegovina Serb 6% Marjanovic et al.
117 Iran South 6% Regueiro et al.
96 Russia Repievka 5% Balanovsky et al.
164 UAE 4% Cadenas et al.
85 Bosnia-Herzegovina Bosniak 4% Marjanovic et al.
176 Pakistan 3% Sengupta et al.
143 Russia Belgorod 3% Balanovsky et al.
75 Russia Ostrov 3% Balanovsky et al.
45 Russia Pristen 2% Balanovsky et al.
90 Bosnia-Herzegovina Croat 2% Marjanovic et al.
72 Qatar 1% Cadenas et al.
128 China 1% Sengupta et al.
728 India various 1% Sengupta et al.
29 Croatia Osijek 0% Battaglia et al.
62 Yemen 0% Cadenas et al.
156 Tibet 0% Gayden et al.
45 Nepal Tamang 0% Gayden et al.
77 Nepal Kathmandu 0% Gayden et al.
23 Japan 0% Sengupta et al.


Sources
(most taken from Wiki R1b page - links may not be functional)

Al-Zahery, N; Semino, O; Benuzzi, G; Magri, C; Passarino, G; Torroni, A; Santachiara-Benerecetti, AS (2003). "Y-chromosome and mtDNA polymorphisms in Iraq, a crossroad of the early human dispersal and of post-Neolithic migrations". Molecular phylogenetics and evolution 28 (3): 458–72. doi:10.1016/S1055-7903(03)00039-3. PMID 12927131. https://www.familytr...f/Al_Zahery.pdf. "16/139".

Balanovsky et al. (2008), "Two Sources of the Russian Patrilineal Heritage in Their Eurasian Context", AJHG 82 (1): 236–250, doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2007.09.019, http://www.sciencedi...e64d988ec6b4d15

Balaresque et al. (2010), "A Predominantly Neolithic Origin for European Paternal Lineages", PLoS Biol. 8 (1), doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000285, PMID PMC2799514, http://www.ncbi.nlm....cles/PMC2799514

Battaglia, V; Fornarino, S; Al-Zahery, N; Olivieri, A; Pala, M; Myres, NM; King, RJ; Rootsi, S et al. (2009). "Y-chromosomal evidence of the cultural diffusion of agriculture in Southeast Europe.". European journal of human genetics : EJHG 17 (6): 820–30. doi:10.1038/ejhg.2008.249. PMID 19107149.

Cadenas et al. (2007), "Y-chromosome diversity characterizes the Gulf of Oman", European Journal of Human Genetics 16: 1–13, doi:10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201934

Cinnioğlu, C; King, R; Kivisild, T; Kalfoğlu, E; Atasoy, S; Cavalleri, GL; Lillie, AS; Roseman, CC et al. (2004). "Excavating Y-chromosome haplotype strata in Anatolia.". Human genetics 114 (2): 127–48. doi:10.1007/s00439-003-1031-4. PMID 14586639. http://hpgl.stanford...14_p127-148.pdf.

Contu, D; Morelli, L; Santoni, F; Foster, JW; Francalacci, P; Cucca, F; Hawks, John (2008). "Y-chromosome based evidence for pre-neolithic origin of the genetically homogeneous but diverse Sardinian population: inference for association scans.". PloS one 3 (1): e1430. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0001430. PMID 18183308. "174/930".

Di Gaetano, C; Cerutti, N; Crobu, F; Robino, C; Inturri, S; Gino, S; Guarrera, S; Underhill, PA et al. (2009). "Differential Greek and northern African migrations to Sicily are supported by genetic evidence from the Y chromosome.". European journal of human genetics : EJHG 17 (1): 91–9. doi:10.1038/ejhg.2008.120. PMID 18685561. "57/232".

Gayden, T; Cadenas, AM; Regueiro, M; Singh, NB; Zhivotovsky, LA; Underhill, PA; Cavalli-Sforza, LL; Herrera, RJ (2007). "The Himalayas as a directional barrier to gene flow.". American journal of human genetics 80 (5): 884–94. doi:10.1086/516757. PMID 17436243.

King, RJ; Ozcan, SS; Carter, T; Kalfoğlu, E; Atasoy, S; Triantaphyllidis, C; Kouvatsi, A; Lin, AA et al. (2008). "Differential Y-chromosome Anatolian influences on the Greek and Cretan Neolithic.". Annals of human genetics 72 (Pt 2): 205–14. doi:10.1111/j.1469-1809.2007.00414.x. PMID 18269686.

A. S. Lobov et al. (2009), "Structure of the Gene Pool of Bashkir Subpopulations" (original text in Russian)

Marjanovic D, Fornarino S, Montagna S, et al. (November 2005). "The peopling of modern Bosnia-Herzegovina: Y-chromosome haplogroups in the three main ethnic groups". Ann. Hum. Genet. 69 (Pt 6): 757–63. doi:10.1111/j.1529-8817.2005.00190.x. PMID 16266413. http://www3.intersci...t%206&spage=757.

Moore et al.; McEvoy, B; Cape, E; Simms, K; Bradley, DG (2006). "A Y-Chromosome Signature of Hegemony in Gaelic Ireland". American journal of human genetics 78 (2): 334–8. doi:10.1086/500055. PMID 16358217. PMC 1380239. http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC1380239/

Nebel et al. (2001), “The Y Chromosome Pool of Jews as Part of the Genetic Landscape of the Middle East” American journal of human genetics 69 (5):1095–1112. PMID 1274378.

Regueiro et al., M; Cadenas, AM; Gayden, T; Underhill, PA; Herrera, RJ (2006). "Iran: Tricontinental Nexus for Y-Chromosome Driven Migration". Hum Hered 61 (3): 132–143. doi:10.1159/000093774. PMID 16770078. http://content.karge...ename=93774.pdf.

Robino et al. (2008), "Analysis of Y-chromosomal SNP haplogroups and STR haplotypes in an Algerian population sample", Journal International Journal of Legal Medicine 122 (3): 251, doi:10.1007/s00414-007-0203-5

Sengupta, S; Zhivotovsky, LA; King, R; Mehdi, SQ; Edmonds, CA; Chow, CE; Lin, AA; Mitra, M et al. (February 2006). "Polarity and temporality of high-resolution y-chromosome distributions in India identify both indigenous and exogenous expansions and reveal minor genetic influence of Central Asian pastoralists". American journal of human genetics 78 (2): 202–21. doi:10.1086/499411. PMID 16400607. "8/176 R-M73 and 5/176 R-M269 for a total of 13/176 R1b in Pakistan and 4/728 R-M269 in India".

Varzari, Alexander (2006), "Population History of the Dniester-Carpathians: Evidence from Alu Insertion and Y-Chromosome Polymorphisms", Dissertation der Fakultät für Biologie der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, http://edoc.ub.uni-m...i_Alexander.pdf

Zalloua, PA; Xue, Y; Khalife, J; Makhoul, N; Debiane, L; Platt, DE; Royyuru, AK; Herrera, RJ et al. (2008). "Y-chromosomal diversity in Lebanon is structured by recent historical events.". American journal of human genetics 82 (4): 873–82. doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2008.01.020. PMID 18374297


Offline GreenTea

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #16 on: September 24, 2010, 07:52:39 PM »
What bugs me out is how close is my DNA to those %tages? Or is it the most common among the population?

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #17 on: September 24, 2010, 11:32:05 PM »
What bugs me out is how close is my DNA to those %tages? Or is it the most common among the population?

Hi GreenTea.

Assuming the frequencies are representative, the probability that your particular haplogroup will be among the haplogroups I have made bold, is ≈ 80%:

As of 9/22 (n=63)

E1b   3.17%
F   1.59%
G1   1.59%
G2   9.52%
I   1.59%
J1   17.46%
J2   14.29%

N   1.59%
Q1b   1.59%
R1a   4.76%
R1b   28.57%
R2   3.17%
T   11.11%

Sources: FTDNA Iraq, Assyrian, and Aramaic projects, 23andMe and Sorenson databases, and Zalloua et al., "Y-Chromosomal Diversity in Lebanon Is Structured by Recent Historical Events."

The 80% figure referred to above is a general probability.  It is made without knowledge of your family's origins (e.g. Nineveh, Urmia, Hakkari...) and/or other details.  Even then, given the extremely small sample size of folks from some areas, probabilities based on geographic origins are likely unreliable at present.

I am a G1, by the way.  The only one!  I need some company.  :)

You are from Connecticut, right?  I have some family (albeit a bit distant) from CT. 
« Last Edit: September 24, 2010, 11:35:51 PM by dok101 »

Offline GreenTea

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #18 on: September 25, 2010, 06:33:14 AM »
LOL

Yea I am from Connecticut, and about to move to crappy Utah. My family is mostly from Urmia.

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #19 on: September 25, 2010, 06:38:31 AM »
Good luck. ;)

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #20 on: September 27, 2010, 01:06:03 AM »
A few Y-DNA charts/graphs

Many of the frequencies serving as the basis for the visuals, drawn from, in addition to the FTDNA Assyrian, Iraqi, Aramaic, and Armenian projects, the following three studies:

1. Abu-Amero et al., "Saudi Arabian Y-Chromosome diversity and its relationship with nearby regions." http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2156-10-59.pdf

2. Nebel et al., "The Y chromosome pool of Jews as part of the genetic landscape of the Middle East." http://bioanthropology.huji.ac.il/pdf/Nebel_2001b.pdf

3. Zalloua et al., "Y-Chromosomal Diversity in Lebanon Is Structured by Recent Historical Events." http://www.bloggingbeirut.com/docs/zalloua.pdf


« Last Edit: September 27, 2010, 01:51:41 AM by dok101 »

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #21 on: September 27, 2010, 04:37:54 AM »
An image from my Y-DNA Ancestral Origins page at FTDNA.  Although not at the same database, based on my mtDNA values from FTDNA, my best mtDNA match is an individual from Iraq as well.  The mtDNA match, based on the information provided at the database, is likely located in or around the city of Aqrah.

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #22 on: October 09, 2010, 04:57:39 AM »
I have attached a finding that I sincerely hope will be further examined by researchers and other academics. 

Although of definite importance, discoveries related to our ancestral origins are not the exclusive goal of the project. Just, if not more important, are the health-related discoveries specific to the Assyrian people and other speakers of Aramaic.  For instance, based on the autosomal data accumulated I have found indications that a potentially fatal medical disorder, pseudocholinesterase deficiency (anesthesia sensitivity), may occur at an increased frequency in the Assyrian population.  Upon further research, and consistent with the findings in the attachment below, I discovered that if Assyrians do indeed have a higher frequency of pseudocholinesterase deficiency, it is a genetic disorder shared with Jewish Iranians and Jewish Iraqis.  See here: http://www.checkorphan.org/grid/news/people/a-genetic-screening-could-save-lives-among-iranian-jews

As I said to Ashoor recently, testing our DNA is one of the most patriotic things we can do for our people.  I hope more folks decide to test and join the project.  There is so much we can accomplish, but unfortunately, since we are not being studied to any great extent by the research community, there is a dearth of genetic data on our people.  It is up to us.   

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #23 on: October 09, 2010, 05:03:31 AM »
Some background information on the Iranian Jewish community, the Nash Didan, that I refer to in the attachment above:

Quote
The community was founded, as tradition indicates, by Jews who fled to that area during the Babylonian Exile and did not return to Israel after the declaration issued by the emperor Cyrus II of Persia. Since the Jews were considered foreigners, they were not allowed to work the land, and hence most of them were merchants. They spoke a specific dialect of Aramaic, and also Farsi and Azeri Turkish. While the Arabs...started to speak Arabic after the Muslim occupation,the Jews (as the Assyrians) have kept their Aramaic language, And called it "Lishan Didan" (Aramaic: our language).The mountain borders of that area have helped keeping the culture, customs and language of the Nash Didan. The Assyrian Aramaic is very similar to the Nash Didan dialect. During ancient times Aramaic was the official language in that area (Syria, Babylon and Persia). Jews who spoke Aramaic settled in Urmia and Villages close by in the end of the 8th century BC. That is proven by bronze, silver and gold archaeological artifacts found with marked elements of the Jewish culture close by to Urmiah. In the Old Armenian cemetery there are gravestones from with Aramaic carvings on beside the symbols of Magen David and the Menorah (Lamp).

In 2005, about 14,000 of the Nash Didan lived in Israel.


http://nashdidan.co.il/nash.php?lang=en

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #24 on: October 09, 2010, 05:35:06 AM »
The apparent autosomal affinity between Assyrians, Jewish Iraqis, and Jewish Iranians, based on 23andMe user data, once again demonstrated.  The reference samples between the two plots remain consistent, save for the aforementioned additional 23andMe user data:     
« Last Edit: October 09, 2010, 05:36:09 AM by dok101 »

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #25 on: October 09, 2010, 05:42:40 AM »
And one more:

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #26 on: October 21, 2010, 05:18:58 PM »
Comparing my Assyrian autosomal signature with Iraqi Jews, Iranian Jews, Armenians, Georgians, Iranians, Turks, Syrians, Lebanese, and Jordanians. 

Me > Iranians Jews > Armenians > Iraqi Jews > Iranians > Turks > Georgians > Lebanese > Syrians > Jordanians.

Please, my Assyrian brothers and sisters, we need many, many more participants.  I cannot do this alone. 
« Last Edit: October 21, 2010, 05:19:28 PM by dok101 »

Offline Rumtaya

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #27 on: October 21, 2010, 05:48:46 PM »
Comparing my Assyrian autosomal signature with Iraqi Jews, Iranian Jews, Armenians, Georgians, Iranians, Turks, Syrians, Lebanese, and Jordanians. 

Me > Iranians Jews > Armenians > Iraqi Jews > Iranians > Turks > Georgians > Lebanese > Syrians > Jordanians.

Please, my Assyrian brothers and sisters, we need many, many more participants.  I cannot do this alone. 


what does that image tell us? Who are you most close to?

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #28 on: October 21, 2010, 06:18:01 PM »
what does that image tell us? Who are you most close to?

Amazingly, we are closest to the Iranian Jews!  Their oral traditions hold that our ancestors, many millennia ago, brought their ancestors to Iran (then Media)!  This has also been replicated on other charts and plots based on as many as five Assyrians' autosomal DNA.

Correlation values.  The higher the value, the greater the relationship to my autosomal DNA:

Iranian Jewish 0.992411697
Armenian 0.979404983
Iraqi Jewish 0.979380215
Iranian 0.944531412
Turkish 0.943627864
Georgian 0.911260923
Lebanese 0.883752295
Syrian 0.85102764
Jordanian 0.786012409

Again, no academic is looking at us.  As far as I know, at the present time, they do not have  plans to examine our genetic identity. The consensus appears to be that we are nothing more than Arabs and Kurds.  An assumption that is being proven absolutely false by the DNA data! All of my attempts to contact academics fall on deaf ears.  That is why I have undertaken this task myself.  That is why I need everyone's support.  
« Last Edit: October 21, 2010, 06:22:05 PM by dok101 »

Offline Rumtaya

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #29 on: October 22, 2010, 06:51:58 AM »
Amazingly, we are closest to the Iranian Jews!  Their oral traditions hold that our ancestors, many millennia ago, brought their ancestors to Iran (then Media)!  This has also been replicated on other charts and plots based on as many as five Assyrians' autosomal DNA.

Correlation values.  The higher the value, the greater the relationship to my autosomal DNA:

Iranian Jewish 0.992411697
Armenian 0.979404983
Iraqi Jewish 0.979380215
Iranian 0.944531412
Turkish 0.943627864
Georgian 0.911260923
Lebanese 0.883752295
Syrian 0.85102764
Jordanian 0.786012409

Again, no academic is looking at us.  As far as I know, at the present time, they do not have  plans to examine our genetic identity. The consensus appears to be that we are nothing more than Arabs and Kurds.  An assumption that is being proven absolutely false by the DNA data! All of my attempts to contact academics fall on deaf ears.  That is why I have undertaken this task myself.  That is why I need everyone's support.  

Thanks for the celarification.

In the researches done by this Sforza or what his name was for the assyrianfoundation they showed that assyrians closest to Jordanians and then Iraqis.... I guess we need alot of assyrians doing a dna test so that we have a representative result.

Offline xxSanhoxx

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #30 on: October 22, 2010, 08:27:54 AM »
Its interesting that the iraqi jews arent closer than iranian jews. arent the iraqi jews originally mostly from assyrian ethnicy? (this one known as "kurdish jews" or as "assyrian jews" which are speaking a dialect of syriac and have similar tradition, art and so on as us..)
so logical they have to have the same results as assyrian dna, or?
"..To be an Assyrian is to feel: The past is my heritage I shall forget it not; the present, my responsibility; the future, my challenge." - Dr. David Barsum Perley

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #31 on: October 22, 2010, 10:39:53 AM »
Its interesting that the iraqi jews arent closer than iranian jews. arent the iraqi jews originally mostly from assyrian ethnicy? (this one known as "kurdish jews" or as "assyrian jews" which are speaking a dialect of syriac and have similar tradition, art and so on as us..)
so logical they have to have the same results as assyrian dna, or?

They are both relatively close.  One thing to keep in mind regarding the last graphic is that the Assyrian sample is based on me exclusively.  That is precisely why we need more participants.  As Rumtaya suggested, the more folks we have, the greater the significance of the results.  One thing is clear, however.  Our autosomal identity is most similar to the following three --thus far tested-- populations: Iranian Jews, Iraqi Jews, and Armenians.  I suspect Levantine Christian populations (e.g. Maronite), based on other results, to also display a great autosomal affinity to Assyrians.

The Cavalli-Sforza paper was based on outdated techniques.  Although it was current for its time, the advent of affordable autosomal, Y-DNA, and mtDNA testing has rendered those results for population genetics purposes inadequate.

Offline Hanuni

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #32 on: October 22, 2010, 08:52:52 PM »
Once again, my dear friend, thank you for all of your effort in Assyrian genetics. Your work shall not be forgotten. Hopefully, with time, academics will look upon your work and begin to study our nation.
“Their enemies had realized their national potential long before the Assyrians themselves. The enemy was not afraid of good farmers, good parents, good church-going parishioners...the enemy was afraid of Assyrians wrapped in nationhood.”

-Mount Semele, Ivan Kakovitch

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #33 on: October 22, 2010, 09:24:27 PM »
Thank you, my brother.  I sincerely appreciate it.  I thank you too for your great contribution to Assyrian genetics. 

By the way, I just noticed your signature.  I believe my grandfather was Ivan's first teacher!!  Ivan's father and my grandfather were deported to the Gulags of Kazakhstan in '38 and '39, along with hundreds of other Assyrians living in the Ukraine and Russia.  My grandfather, as far as I know, was the only Assyrian teacher at the camp. 

Offline dok101

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Re: Announcing the Aramaic DNA Project
« Reply #34 on: October 25, 2010, 04:46:38 PM »
Some amazing results were posted yesterday.  To the best of my knowledge, this is the very first time that Assyrian autosomal DNA has been compared to the autosomal DNA of this many of the Mizrahim Jewish communities.  The 10 K values represent inferred ancestral components.  The greater the similarity between inferred ancestral components, the greater the likely autosomal affinity between populations.  

Assyrians match the following five populations best:
Azeri Jews
Uzbek Jews
Iranian Jews
Georgian Jews
Iraqi Jews

The correlations between the five Jewish populations referred to above, and the Assyrian data, were extremely close.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2010, 04:51:35 PM by dok101 »

 

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