Author Topic: Assyrian Alphabet  (Read 3594 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Unity

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 39
  • Gender: Male
Assyrian Alphabet
« on: November 14, 2010, 06:51:28 PM »
Hey everyone!   :)
Let me introduce myself.
My name is Sargon and I am from Vaughan, Ontario, Canada.
I just registered here to learn some Assyrian.
I speak the Eastern Assyrian dialect and I am willing to learn my native language! :wavetowel:
I came across this site :

http://www.learnassyrian.com/aramaic/

Some of my friends claim that There is a mistake regarding the way the letters are written as well as the pronunciation and some other mistakes.
Can someone please verify?
I really like how they show you the way of writing the letters though.
Is there any other website similar to the one above that shows you how to write the letters?


Thanks in advance
« Last Edit: November 14, 2010, 06:52:51 PM by Unity »


I am Aramean

I am Assyrian

I am Chaldean

I am Mesopotamian

I AM BETH NAHRIN !!!

Offline Tambur

  • Mid-Level Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1472
  • Gender: Male
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2010, 08:32:54 PM »
Welcome :)

A couple of points:

- There's nothing wrong with the way the alphabets are pronounced in that website, what your friends are probably referring to goes back to how some people who speak certain dialects pronounce the alphabets, for example Assyrians from Urmia probably say Beet, while Assyrians from Tiyari say Beth, there's no right or wrong in here, just different dialects, the only letter in that website not pronounced properly is Ayin (The website says Aih).

- The way to write the alphabets is a personal preference, what the site shows you is methods to write them but I say, whatever makes you write better is what you should use, again, there's no right or wrong in this.

Offline mrzurnaci

  • Special Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6076
  • Gender: Male
    • Zurnaya's Youtube
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2010, 10:01:03 PM »
Alaph is not equivalent to A, because Alaph isn't a vowel, it's a consonant, it symbolizes a pause.

some words in the article are foreign words, like wurda which is persian, wakhshee is perso-arabic, qalama -arabic and so on

also, J, CH, and ZH like shareh are foreign sounds and don't exist in Assyrian, all other sounds like F, V, THH, and TH sounds exist.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2010, 10:06:35 PM by mrzurnaci »

Assyrian Voice Forum

Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2010, 10:01:03 PM »

Offline Carlo

  • Mid-Level Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1100
  • Gender: Male
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2010, 01:05:15 PM »
I used to agree with what Tambur said about there not being an "official" way to write the letters, but I'm not entirely convinced anymore. Of course, back in the day when the alphabet looked more like the Phoenician alphabet (i.e., not cursive/connected), there probably weren't any rules and people wrote as they pleased. As the script evolved and became cursive (connected), though, I think certain patterns emerged to make writing faster and neater:

1) If you imagine every letter inside of a "box," the first stroke of every letter begins in the bottom-right corner. No exceptions.

2) Try to make the strokes in a right-to-left direction (i.e., the direction you read in), and try to end the letter with a horizontal stroke that sits on the line and ends in the bottom-left corner of the "box." There are exceptions to this rule: the letters that don't end in that way are alaph, dalath, he, waw, zayn, cadhe, resh, and taw. In the Estrangela version of the alphabet, none of those letters that break the rule have a horizontal line that ends at the bottom-left.

3) The point where the letter ends at the bottom-left of the box is the exact point where the next letter begins: the bottom-right corner of its own box. IMO, this is very important for making your connecting lines "flow," otherwise they'll look choppy and you'll easily see the breaks between the letters. The letters that are exceptions to rule 2 above (i.e., don't end in the bottom-left corner) don't join to the next letter, which makes sense because they don't end in a horizontal line that leads into the next letter's bottom-right corner. Instead, you'd write the letter that comes after it as if you were starting the letter at the beginning of a word.

There are a lot of people who don't know how to join the letters correctly, and I think it stems from not knowing how to write the letters.

Nothing against the owner of learnassyrian.com, but it's far from the best site to learn how to write. There used to be an excellent site called http://www.assyrianlanguage.com that taught in-depth grammar of the classical language (lishana `ateeqa), but it hasn't been working in a few years. Fortunately, you can see the archived site at http://web.archive.org/web/20070611235024/www.assyrianlanguage.com/. The archives are buggy and slow and the pictures/audio files don't all work, but it's a lot better than nothing. In Level One of that site, it has most of the letters written according to my rules above (except for gamal, Teth, and lamadh, which are a little backward).

You can also try this thread: http://www.assyrianvoice.net/forum/index.php?topic=25453.msg563144#msg563144.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2010, 08:11:56 PM by Carlo »

Offline Cascade

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4659
  • Gender: Male
  • Many waters cannot quench love.
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2017, 04:03:21 AM »
Alaph is not equivalent to A, because Alaph isn't a vowel, it's a consonant, it symbolizes a pause.
Alep can be used as a vowel. Or at least, it's a substitute for a vowel nowadays.
Quote
also, J, CH, and ZH like shareh are foreign sounds and don't exist in Assyrian, all other sounds like F, V, THH, and TH sounds exist.
Ever think that they can be pure Syriac words which initially had the F or V sounds, but since we lived with foreigners such as Persians and Arabs, we adopted their accent to pronounce these words?

Maybe "zhareh" in Syriac is actually "zareh"? And "jureh" (pee) is "gureh" or "shureh"? Perhaps all the J sounds in modern Assyrian originally had a hard G sound to them (gamel). And maybe words with a "Ch" sound were initially "K" in Syriac, before Persian/Arabic influence. This is evident because some dialects say "chasa" and "chakeh" for stomach and teeth, respectively. But most Assyrians say them as "keesa" and "keekeh", retaining their original Syriac sound.

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. - Charles Darwin

Offline mrzurnaci

  • Special Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6076
  • Gender: Male
    • Zurnaya's Youtube
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2017, 12:59:18 PM »
Alep can be used as a vowel. Or at least, it's a substitute for a vowel nowadays. Ever think that they can be pure Syriac words which initially had the F or V sounds, but since we lived with foreigners such as Persians and Arabs, we adopted their accent to pronounce these words?

Maybe "zhareh" in Syriac is actually "zareh"? And "jureh" (pee) is "gureh" or "shureh"? Perhaps all the J sounds in modern Assyrian originally had a hard G sound to them (gamel). And maybe words with a "Ch" sound were initially "K" in Syriac, before Persian/Arabic influence. This is evident because some dialects say "chasa" and "chakeh" for stomach and teeth, respectively. But most Assyrians say them as "keesa" and "keekeh", retaining their original Syriac sound.



no. Alaph is not a vowel... alaph is a pause and a vowel INDICATOR, indicating a vowel does not make one a vowel.

for keesa -> https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%9F%DC%9D%DC%A3%DC%90
keekeh -> https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%9F%DC%9F%DC%90

no, Jureh is foreign. The native Syriac word for urine is "tunna"
look @ https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%AC%DC%9D%DC%A2%DC%AC%DC%90
@ https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%AC%DC%9D%DC%A2%DC%90
@ https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%AC%DC%98%DC%A2%DC%90#Etymology_2
@ https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%AC%DC%90%DC%A2%DC%AC%DC%90#Etymology_2
From the root ܬ-ܘ-ܢ (t-w-n) related to urinating, from Proto-Semitic *ṯwn.

there's also https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%A6%DC%AB%DC%AA%DC%AC%DC%90
and https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%AC%DC%A6%DC%AB%DC%98%DC%AA%DC%AC%DC%90

also, in the case of "ch", u forgot to say "chappe" for clapping when it's really "kappe" :)

Offline Cascade

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4659
  • Gender: Male
  • Many waters cannot quench love.
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2017, 08:31:15 PM »
no. Alaph is not a vowel... alaph is a pause and a vowel INDICATOR, indicating a vowel does not make one a vowel.

for keesa -> https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%9F%DC%9D%DC%A3%DC%90
keekeh -> https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%9F%DC%9F%DC%90

no, Jureh is foreign. The native Syriac word for urine is "tunna"
look @ https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%AC%DC%9D%DC%A2%DC%AC%DC%90
@ https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%AC%DC%9D%DC%A2%DC%90
@ https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%AC%DC%98%DC%A2%DC%90#Etymology_2
@ https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%AC%DC%90%DC%A2%DC%AC%DC%90#Etymology_2
From the root ܬ-ܘ-ܢ (t-w-n) related to urinating, from Proto-Semitic *ṯwn.

there's also https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%A6%DC%AB%DC%AA%DC%AC%DC%90
and https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%AC%DC%A6%DC%AB%DC%98%DC%AA%DC%AC%DC%90

also, in the case of "ch", u forgot to say "chappe" for clapping when it's really "kappe" :)
Nice to know that keesa and keekeh are Syriac words, and better even, have Akkadian influence.

Ah see, so I was sort right when it came to the "ch" sounds originally being "K" (chappe = kappe). ;)

Maybe jureh is a slang word made by a couple of mischievous Assyrians from a few hundred years ago to denote "piss" and was used as a euphemism? If not, where did we borrow it from?
It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. - Charles Darwin

Offline mrzurnaci

  • Special Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6076
  • Gender: Male
    • Zurnaya's Youtube
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2017, 12:43:03 PM »
Maybe jureh is a slang word made by a couple of mischievous Assyrians from a few hundred years ago to denote "piss" and was used as a euphemism? If not, where did we borrow it from?

unfortunately, that's what they did to "pezza" -> https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%A6%DC%99%DC%90

'pezza' originally meant 'beer, barley water' which I'm assuming as a yellowish tinge and you know what came next lol.

Offline Cascade

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4659
  • Gender: Male
  • Many waters cannot quench love.
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2017, 08:05:41 PM »
unfortunately, that's what they did to "pezza" -> https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DC%A6%DC%99%DC%90

'pezza' originally meant 'beer, barley water' which I'm assuming as a yellowish tinge and you know what came next lol.
What about teeza/sherma (butt) and era/buta (penis)? Lol

I don't  hear anybody using pezza though (for piss or for anything). :/
It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. - Charles Darwin

Offline mrzurnaci

  • Special Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6076
  • Gender: Male
    • Zurnaya's Youtube
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2017, 12:28:44 AM »
What about teeza/sherma (butt) and era/buta (penis)? Lol

I don't  hear anybody using pezza though (for piss or for anything). :/

"teeza" is an old borrowing from Arabic; it was borrowed before the 1400s I think.

"sherma" is a variant of "shurma" which is borrowed from Arabic "surm".

sherma means "rectum".

era and buta are foreign (idk what languages they're from though)

The correct terms are ܕܸܟ݂ܪܵܐ (dekhra), ܙܘܼܠܒܵܢܵܐ (zolbana), and ܠܸܒ݁ܵܐ | ܒܸܣܪܵܐ (lebba or besra, as a euphemism).

Offline Sharukinu

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 419
  • Gender: Male
  • www.AssyrianVoice.net
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2017, 12:05:53 PM »
Although the Ch sound might not have been native to us in the distant past, I think it can be considered a fully integrated sound in our modern language. There are plenty of cases of native Assyrian words, words tracing back to ancient Aramaic, Akkadian, etc, that have evolved to have "ch" sound integrated into them (often replacing the k sound).

For example, there are many Assyrians who say "chelba (kelba/dog), chul (kil/all), icha (iṭsha/nine)" etc - these words aren't loanwords and the usage of "ch" has been quite normalised in certain dialects.
“It is pleasant, when the sea is high and the winds are dashing the waves about, to watch from the shores the struggles of another.”

― Titus Livy

Offline mrzurnaci

  • Special Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6076
  • Gender: Male
    • Zurnaya's Youtube
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2017, 05:07:07 PM »
For example, there are many Assyrians who say "chelba (kelba/dog), chul (kil/all), icha (iṭsha/nine)" etc - these words aren't loanwords and the usage of "ch" has been quite normalised in certain dialects.
the "ch" sound is influence from Persian. also, nine uses Taw, not Teth. so it's "etsh'a"  ( ܐܬܫܥܐ )

Offline Sharukinu

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 419
  • Gender: Male
  • www.AssyrianVoice.net
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2017, 05:33:51 PM »
the "ch" sound is influence from Persian. also, nine uses Taw, not Teth. so it's "etsh'a"  ( ܐܬܫܥܐ )

My bad, it is Taw. As I said, none of those words were borrowed. The sounds that a language uses constantly evolve and whether they were influenced by a certain language is irrelevant (and speculative most of the time) - the point is that it's a very regular part of speech now and it's used to pronounce words with authentic Assyrian origins. In the case of itsha becoming icha, that's a very natural development that, in all likeliness, happened without any external influence and therefore is a perfect example of that aforementioned evolution.

The Ch sound might have been odd in Classical Syriac but we don't speak Classical Syriac.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2017, 05:34:52 PM by Sharukinu »
“It is pleasant, when the sea is high and the winds are dashing the waves about, to watch from the shores the struggles of another.”

― Titus Livy

Offline mrzurnaci

  • Special Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6076
  • Gender: Male
    • Zurnaya's Youtube
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2017, 08:02:32 PM »
My bad, it is Taw. As I said, none of those words were borrowed. The sounds that a language uses constantly evolve and whether they were influenced by a certain language is irrelevant (and speculative most of the time) - the point is that it's a very regular part of speech now and it's used to pronounce words with authentic Assyrian origins. In the case of itsha becoming icha, that's a very natural development that, in all likeliness, happened without any external influence and therefore is a perfect example of that aforementioned evolution.

The Ch sound might have been odd in Classical Syriac but we don't speak Classical Syriac.

it is odd because there is no letter for such a sound, thus it's a foreign sound.

"ch" can be reproduced by putting sheen after taw which is why phonologists put it as "tsh"

Offline Cascade

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4659
  • Gender: Male
  • Many waters cannot quench love.
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #14 on: April 15, 2017, 08:17:48 PM »
"teeza" is an old borrowing from Arabic; it was borrowed before the 1400s I think.

"sherma" is a variant of "shurma" which is borrowed from Arabic "surm".

sherma means "rectum".

era and buta are foreign (idk what languages they're from though)

The correct terms are ܕܸܟ݂ܪܵܐ (dekhra), ܙܘܼܠܒܵܢܵܐ (zolbana), and ܠܸܒ݁ܵܐ | ܒܸܣܪܵܐ (lebba or besra, as a euphemism).
Maybe shurm and teez are Arabic and Syriac cognates?

Era could be an offensive slang for **** that we made up. Are you really sure it's foreign?

Buta has an emphatic ṭ sound (tet), so it has to be Semitic of origins; Unless we deliberately gave it that sound, but I doubt that since we do have a Taw/T sound in our vocab that's used immensely. So there was no point of "tet-ing" the T.
It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. - Charles Darwin

Offline Sharukinu

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 419
  • Gender: Male
  • www.AssyrianVoice.net
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #15 on: April 16, 2017, 03:26:28 AM »
it is odd because there is no letter for such a sound, thus it's a foreign sound.

You know very well that Kap with a magliyana expresses the ch sound just as many other modified letters express other sounds that you don't consider foreign. So in this respect, there's not much of a difference between Chap, Veth, Feh, etc aside from what period in time you want to stick to. I think we should keep using it and other modern sounds that we use so long as the words are authentic. Also I think we should revive sounds that have become rare or virtually never used, like Veth and Dhalat - especially Veth which is often pronounced like Waw, causing confusion between consonantal roots.


"ch" can be reproduced by putting sheen after taw which is why phonologists put it as "tsh"

Yes, which is why I argued that the ch sound can easily develop naturally from our ancient languages.
“It is pleasant, when the sea is high and the winds are dashing the waves about, to watch from the shores the struggles of another.”

― Titus Livy

Offline mrzurnaci

  • Special Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6076
  • Gender: Male
    • Zurnaya's Youtube
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2017, 10:51:46 PM »
You know very well that Kap with a magliyana expresses the ch sound just as many other modified letters express other sounds that you don't consider foreign. So in this respect, there's not much of a difference between Chap, Veth, Feh, etc aside from what period in time you want to stick to. I think we should keep using it and other modern sounds that we use so long as the words are authentic. Also I think we should revive sounds that have become rare or virtually never used, like Veth and Dhalat - especially Veth which is often pronounced like Waw, causing confusion between consonantal roots.


Yes, which is why I argued that the ch sound can easily develop naturally from our ancient languages.

But it's not a native sound. It's a NATURAL sound but not a native sound to Semitic languages...

magliyana was created ALOT later than the different sounds we make by altering letters.

Offline Cascade

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4659
  • Gender: Male
  • Many waters cannot quench love.
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #17 on: April 17, 2017, 02:26:59 AM »
But it's not a native sound. It's a NATURAL sound but not a native sound to Semitic languages...

magliyana was created ALOT later than the different sounds we make by altering letters.
As a purist, shouldn't you be against magliyanas and other diacritics as they alter the letters and allow "foreign" sounds within the alphabet?
It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. - Charles Darwin

Offline mrzurnaci

  • Special Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6076
  • Gender: Male
    • Zurnaya's Youtube
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #18 on: April 17, 2017, 01:26:51 PM »
As a purist, shouldn't you be against magliyanas and other diacritics as they alter the letters and allow "foreign" sounds within the alphabet?

magliyana yes, others no. The Rukkakha mark is necessary to implement the other native semitic sounds.

magliyana yes because past Assyrians usually just translated foreign words into an Assyrian Aramaic version, some examples...

Caesar (name) -> QeCar (C represents Sade I believe).
Daraj (Arabic for ladder) -> darga (unused Syriac version)
katapan (old Armenian word for governor) -> QaTTaban (double T is Teth)
tábla (ancient Greek for "table) -> TTableetha (double T is Teth)

What's the point in having magliyana for exact foreign sounds when our ancestors, both far and recent, simply changed the sounds to match our language?

Offline Sharukinu

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 419
  • Gender: Male
  • www.AssyrianVoice.net
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #19 on: April 21, 2017, 03:27:57 PM »
But it's not a native sound. It's a NATURAL sound but not a native sound to Semitic languages...

Native to Semitic languages? Since languages constantly evolve, what do you mean by this? Should we go back to Proto-Semitic sounds only? The CH sound is native since it's been integrated into a host of evolved authentic ancient Assyrian words that are frequently used by many modern speakers -as I said, it's a matter of how far back you want to go.

Come to think of it, I don't think there were any sounds like Veth or Feh in Proto-Semitic. If that's true, then those sounds "aren't native" either.
“It is pleasant, when the sea is high and the winds are dashing the waves about, to watch from the shores the struggles of another.”

― Titus Livy

Offline mrzurnaci

  • Special Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6076
  • Gender: Male
    • Zurnaya's Youtube
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #20 on: April 21, 2017, 06:01:39 PM »
Native to Semitic languages? Since languages constantly evolve, what do you mean by this? Should we go back to Proto-Semitic sounds only? The CH sound is native since it's been integrated into a host of evolved authentic ancient Assyrian words that are frequently used by many modern speakers -as I said, it's a matter of how far back you want to go.

Come to think of it, I don't think there were any sounds like Veth or Feh in Proto-Semitic. If that's true, then those sounds "aren't native" either.

Veth and Feh developed on their own though, not from foreign influence.

"ch" developed from foreign influence around the Turkish and Iranian languages.

Offline Cascade

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4659
  • Gender: Male
  • Many waters cannot quench love.
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #21 on: April 21, 2017, 08:43:06 PM »
Veth and Feh developed on their own though, not from foreign influence.
Are you certain? Maybe these sounds also came from neighboring languages, like ancient Persian. Ever thought of that?
It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. - Charles Darwin

Offline mrzurnaci

  • Special Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6076
  • Gender: Male
    • Zurnaya's Youtube
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #22 on: April 22, 2017, 05:10:23 PM »
Are you certain? Maybe these sounds also came from neighboring languages, like ancient Persian. Ever thought of that?
Ask carlo then!

Offline Cascade

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4659
  • Gender: Male
  • Many waters cannot quench love.
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #23 on: April 22, 2017, 09:26:24 PM »
Ask carlo then!
You can PM him. He's really nice. But just give him a little break because I've been asking him questions in the past few weeks. ;)

Well, our ancient alphabet always had a Peh and Beth instead of Feh and Vet (last time I checked). Peh always made a P sound in the Semitic abjads. But I don't know...
It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. - Charles Darwin

Offline mrzurnaci

  • Special Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6076
  • Gender: Male
    • Zurnaya's Youtube
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2017, 01:19:27 AM »
You can PM him. He's really nice. But just give him a little break because I've been asking him questions in the past few weeks. ;)

Well, our ancient alphabet always had a Peh and Beth instead of Feh and Vet (last time I checked). Peh always made a P sound in the Semitic abjads. But I don't know...


The "f" and "v" sound existed in our language since before the middle ages, we've been exposed to "ch" since the Persians but we never incorporated that into our alphabet...
look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashurian_Aramaic which also included "f" and "v".
same with https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_Babylonian_Aramaic
It's also the same with the Mandaic alphabet -> http://www.omniglot.com/writing/mandaic.htm

Offline Neta1991

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 356
  • Gender: Male
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #25 on: May 01, 2017, 10:20:47 AM »
OMG!!!! I am just so happy right know, l just realized that for me being west assyrian, its just very easy to learn east assyrian, for example, kalba means dog in east assyrian and we in west says kalbo, almost the same, so facking easy yall!!!:D:D:D::D l want to learn east assyrian and when l tried to learn it just a few moments ago l already learnt some many words and its so easy!

Offline Cascade

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4659
  • Gender: Male
  • Many waters cannot quench love.
Re: Assyrian Alphabet
« Reply #26 on: May 01, 2017, 08:16:50 PM »
OMG!!!! I am just so happy right know, l just realized that for me being west assyrian, its just very easy to learn east assyrian, for example, kalba means dog in east assyrian and we in west says kalbo, almost the same, so facking easy yall!!!:D:D:D::D l want to learn east assyrian and when l tried to learn it just a few moments ago l already learnt some many words and its so easy!
Yeah, but other words can be quite unintelligible. ;)

Especially when they're speaking it. Maybe reading eastern Assyrian may sound simple, but hearing a speech would be more difficult.
It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. - Charles Darwin

 

OLD ASSYRIAN ALPHABET

Started by UneekBoard Chit Chat

Replies: 1
Views: 403
Last post September 30, 2007, 06:02:00 AM
by Anitaaaaaaaaaa
Wanted: Assyrian Alphabet Puzzle

Started by ElaineBoard Assyrian Language Center

Replies: 6
Views: 2202
Last post October 10, 2013, 01:36:27 PM
by Carlo
A Great Way to Learn the Assyrian Alphabet

Started by ASHOORBoard Assyrian Language Center

Replies: 2
Views: 2381
Last post April 13, 2017, 03:51:21 AM
by Cascade
Downloadable Assyrian Alphabet Charts!

Started by mrzurnaciBoard Assyrian Language Center

Replies: 0
Views: 544
Last post June 30, 2014, 12:17:54 AM
by mrzurnaci
Should we implement the Latin alphabet for Assyrian?

Started by CascadeBoard Assyrian Language Center

Replies: 40
Views: 3372
Last post April 19, 2017, 04:07:19 AM
by Cascade